Biking by the Lake at Night

The road home seemed longer in the dark. Full of shadowed bends and turns it plunged me into puddles of blindness. I was on the Waterfront Trail. Shrubs and trees morphed into shadow beings, eating the light. Rustling leaves sounded like the crunching of small bones.

My back was soaked and still more sweat dripped down my face. There was no time to reach into my pocket, grab the rag and mop my brow. The night was here, like the fear, it was too near. I could not peddle fast enough to outrun the blanket of obsura.

The lake shimmered on my right. I found no comfort there that night. Following that silvery shine seemed to be leading me to the underworld. I should have taken the bus home.

Spending the afternoon with a friend was fun. Caught up in the moment we decided to go out for dinner. The autumn evening was warm and dry. I came out on my bike and planned to return home the same way; but this time cycling on the pavement and only using the bike trail where it ran parallel to the street. I would be home in an hour, about the same time as taking a streetcar and a bus.

The main road was on my left. The cars seemed to go faster in the night. Were they too trying to outrun the dark? Two cars weaved across the lanes, no indicators, too fast they cut back into the right lane. Tires squealed as the cars speed into the lakeshore parking lot. One car overtook the other on the bend, accelerated and raced to the end of the lot. The brakes screeched again.

I pushed harder as my heart hammered in my chest. I had to go pass the parking lot. What if the guys in the cars need more fun? The doors flung the open, rock music blared, and four men emerged from each car. Cigarettes and white skins glowed in the liminal light.

I was almost near them. The men gathered around one car and examined its back under the streetlight. Beer cans were in their hands. Deep voices cursed. Then laughter. Marijuana perfumed the air. As I flew by, I saw that the bumper was hanging off the back of the car. There were four more parking lots to go.

I knew the route. I had cycled up and down that section of the Waterfront Trail hundreds of time. But never near midnight. I could not sprint home. It was too far.

The lights of the Palais Royale twinkled ahead. My legs and heart slowed as the warm bulbs drew near. Two women smoked on the steps of the banquet hall. Three men leaned against the railings, also smoking. They were the first pedestrians I had seen near the bike trail. Inside the hall people chattered in little groups, wine glasses in hand. A portrait of Billie Holiday caught my eye. I knew that one well. Mouth opened in ecstasy she sings in front of a microphone with white gardenias glistening in her hair. I heard her singing Strange Fruit in my head. Then I shuddered as I saw them hanging from the poplar tree.

Half way home I got off the bike trail. I was too jumpy to enjoy the lake breeze and the starlight shimmering through the trees. I reminded myself I had nothing to prove. I cycled home on a main road filled with cars, bicycles and more importantly people out walking in the autumn night.

Sailing on a Half Moon

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Where You Sit and What it Says About You

Where do you sit in the classroom? In school I always sat in the first row, right in front of the teacher. The first time I entered a PhD classroom I chose my seat well – the one in the side row at the back, where I was least likely to catch the professor’s eyes.

I preferred it when someone was on either side of me. It was a chance to get to know new faces, and more importantly, they were a good buffer between me and the professor. If I sank low enough in the chair my sidekicks hid me from her view.

I tried to get the same seat each week. It was a familiar and safe spot.

In another class I switched seats each week, partly to see if it made a difference and partly just to meet new people. Well, some students were rather annoyed by this. It seemed as if particular chairs were reserved in their name, in ink that only they could see, and that I had pinched it. It got me thinking why they were so upset and why I was more comfortable sitting in the same spot in class each week.

The answer lies in status quo bias. According to psychologists it is the human tendency to prefer things, ideas, people or positions that are familiar versus trying something new. Change carries risks and takes mental energy. Adhering to the status quo is so much easier. In my grandmother’s words it is better to stick to the devil you know than the one you don’t know.

The status quo bias seems to be our default position in a whole range of situations. It certainly is so when it comes to choosing an Internet provider. The current one is expensive. A month ago the condo sent out a flyer encouraging all to sign up with a cheaper company. The front desk staff said half of the residents had done so, and were pleased with the result. I had thrown away the flyer. With so many things on my plate and the stress of the PhD, I did not have the energy to make the switch even though it was considerably cheaper. This morning I promised the front desk guy I will switch before the month is out. I don’t want to disappoint him.

Black people don’t do outdoors. This seems to be another status quo bias. For a whole ton of reasons we see the outdoors as a white space where we are out of place. I canvassed my Black meet up group to see who would like to try camping for next year. Most of them giggled, shook their head and said why on earth would they want to do that? A few were interested. It is camping for one night only. On a site with flush toilets and showers. It is moot how many will actually come.

Status quo bias is inherently conservative, but it can be challenged, and hence changed. If there was more advertising showing Black people in the outdoors it would change the perception that we don’t belong.

The keeners in my PhD class were spread all around the room. I expected them to bunch up at the front. Where one sits does not does not seems to stereotype the chatterers, at least for graduate students. Back in high school the front rows were reserved for the nerds, keeners and talkers. The middle rows were for the masses. The slackers, the clowns and the daydreamers preferred the back rows.

Sitting up front has no effects on grades according to research. It is just as well. I like my seat on the far side in the back of the classroom. And yes I do get annoyed if someone snags it before I get to class.

A Black View on Climate Change

An opera about Black people, climate change and dub poetry. Lukumi is a fascinating show on so many levels. In the first place it puts Black people at the centre of the environmental debate.

Look at the conservation, outdoor recreation and environmental movements, and all one sees is a river of white faces. It is easy to assume from the images that there are no Black people in Canada. Lukumi puts the colour back into the environmental debates.

Starring D’bi Young as Lukumi, the opera is set in a post-apocalyptic world where humans have destroyed nearly everything. Lukumi, a reluctant warrior-goddess, must journey to the depths of the Earth to find the roots of the tree of life. It might be too late, but a seed from this tree could heal the planet.

Lukumi must conquer her own doubts, travel through a nucleared landscape and convince other animals to help her. And she must battle the black skins in the white masks. These are the soldiers hunting for bleeders, the few women who are still fertile, to restock the nuclear-ruined population.

The opera is also a journey through Black music. The live band shifts from African drumming, to gospel and to jazz. The melody and reggae beats of dub poetry weaves the whole thing together. The large cast are excellent singers. The music is co-composed by Waleed Abdulhamid and D’bi Young.

The opera is not all bleak. Humour comes from Daniel Ellis, as Anancy, a versifier, shape-shifter and unreliable giver of wisdom. The trickster admits that his words have to rhyme, even if it means that half the time the sense is left out. The sound-bite is what matters.

Lukumi is produced by Watah Theatre. The professional company ‘specialises in producing political theatre from a radical queer Black feminist lens.’ The founder is D’Bi Young.

Lukumi mixes African, Caribbean and Indigenous myths to create something uniquely Canadian. It is not the official myth of Canada as a happy land of multicultural people. Rather, the opera exposes how pollution, mining and fracking disproportionally affects Indigenous people in Canada. The opera is a call for environmental and social justice. It we don’t clean up the mess, in the end humans won’t matter. We will be no more.

The opera is at the Tarragon Theatre September 22-October 14, 2017.

Black History Walks Toronto

Hiking in Jamaica

The other side of Jamaica includes forests, mountains and limestone valleys. There is more to Jamaica than just miles of white sandy beaches. On this adventure tour we will hike the only UNESCO World Heritage Site on the island – the Blue and John Crow Mountains. We will watch the sunrise from the peak (2,300 m or 7,500 ft.).

This adventure tour is part of my Daydream Black History Tours around the around the world. They combine the best of adventure, travel and history – all from our unique Black perspective. The trips are a daydream right now. Let’s see if we can turn them into reality.

On the Jamaica tour we will also hike in the footsteps of the Maroons. The escaped slaves hid in their stronghold in the Cockpit Country. We will follow them into the challenging karst limestone hills and valleys.

In between hikes, there will time to relax on the beach, go on a river safari in the mangrove swamps, and to explore the museums and art galleries in Kingston, the island’s capital.

Tour Highlights

  • Hiking the forests of the Blue Mountains.
  • Hiking the limestone hills and valley of the Cockpit Country.
  • Boat safari on the Black River to see the crocodiles in the mangrove swamps. Beach.
  • Explore the culture and history of Kingston.

Daily Itinerary

Day 1 – Arrive in Montego Bay

Day 2 – Troy Trail hike

Day 3 – Quick Step Trail hike

Day 4 – Quick Step Trail hike

Day 5 – Black River safari and beach

Day 6 – Kingston culture tour (museum, plantation Great House, art gallery, Emancipation Park)

Day 7 – Blue Mountains hike

Day 8 – Blue Mountains Peak sun rise hike

Day 9 – Kingston culture tour and return to Montego Bay

Day 10 – Depart from Montego Bay

Facts File

  • 10 day land tour.
  • Minimum 4 and maximum 16 participants.
  • All meals and accommodation included.
  • All hikes lead by experienced and certified local guides.
  • Start and end in Montego Bay, Jamaica.
  • Comfort level – must be able to hike for about six hours each day.
  • Accommodation – comfortable hotels, guest house and lodge.
  • Departure – August 2018.

Who wants to come with me on this daydream trip? Let’s see if we can make it real.

Black History Walks Toronto

Older Academics: Get on Twitter to Boost your Career

It seemed like a great idea. Tweet all the academics featured in the journal, with a link to their article. It was a neat way of promoting the journal and the writers in one easy step. As the editorial assistant on the journal – student job to fund the PhD – I was adding value and not just sitting there staring at a screen all day.

It didn’t work.

My great idea sank after the third tweet. I found out that many of the academics were not Twitter. At first I thought it was just the ones featured in a Canadian journal of cultural studies. Maybe it was our usual reticence about promoting oneself. It turned out that age was the issue.

Academics under 40 used Twitter. Academics over 40 years of age did not.

The younger crowd grew up with social media. They made and consumed millions of posts on YouTube, Facebook, Twitter or other platforms. Social media was as familiar to them as the pimples on their faces.

The older crowd of academics are familiar with the wrinkles on their faces, but do not know how or appreciate the value of sharing them on social media. They are missing a great opportunity for promoting themselves and their work.

Especially for middling academics – the majority of us – who now realise that their cutting edge research has generated little change but has caused plenty of paper cuts.

Using social media is one way of creating a tiny, perfect universe of followers who are interested in the academic’s ideas. It’s better than the global shrug of indifference.

So here are the benefits of using Twitter:

1. Promote Yourself. And the vitally important work you are doing – even if that importance is just in your own mind. A tweet can connect you to others interested in the same area.

2. Find Friends and Allies. Twitter is an efficient way of finding others who are interested in your area of work. It increases the possibility of collaboration on research projects or conference presentations. Your Twitter followers can give you feedback on work in progress.

3. Spy on the Competition. Conversations on Twitter are fast and fleeting. It is a great way of checking out what your competitors are doing, thinking or writing about. Savour that feeling of realizing that you have more followers than your rivals.

4. Cross Boundaries. Academics are forced to focus on a narrow area if they want to be successful. With Twitter those boundaries can be crossed by using and following hashtags that appeal to a wide range of users. For example, #RaceAndSpace tweets are from academics in social justice, geography, outdoors recreation and conservation.

5. Follow the News in your Field. I use Twitter to find out about the latest jobs, conferences, calls for papers and funding opportunities. These are announced long before they reach print publication or get buried on specialist websites.

6. Boost Book Sales. Use Twitter to promote your old and new books. A weekly tweet with a link to the books will do wonders of the sales. Or at least raise awareness that your books are out there, waiting to be read.

7. Gossips and Scandals. Who got fired and why? Who is being sued? How did the university handle/cover that up? Twitter is fantastic for showing the hidden side of academia and what people really think about the hot potato issues of the day. You can join in the conversations or just listen to them. Either way it is riveting.

Twitter is the electronic equivalent of the chats around the office water cooler. We know that the best conversations often happen there.

So older academics, get over your fear or condescension about social media. Get on Twitter. It takes about a minute to set up an account. Do so and start tweeting. Let the world know about you and the vitally important work you are doing.

Heartbeats in Africa: A Memoir of Travel and Love

Toronto Black History Tour

Come and celebrate Black History and Caribbean life with us in Toronto next summer. The Caribana Caribbean Carnival is the biggest street party in North America. On the tour we will visit the stops on the Underground Railroad, hear some great music, eat spicy Caribbean food and dance along the bands.

Let’s make this trip real. There is a lot of Black History and Caribbean sunshine in Toronto. The tour also includes a trip to see Niagara Falls – one of the great wonders of the world. There we will learn about its Black History as well as enjoy a wine tour.

This tour is part of my Daydream Black History Tours around the around the world. They combine the best of adventure, travel and history – all from our unique Black perspective. The trips are a daydream right now. Let’s see if we can turn them into reality.

toronto black history tour

Tour Highlights

  • Caribbean carnival in Toronto
  • Visit Niagara Falls and explore its Black History
  • Walk in the footsteps of Harriet Tubman
  • Underground Railroads stops in Oakville and Hamilton

Daily Itinerary

Day 1 – Arrive in Toronto

Day 2 – Niagara Falls and Niagara-on-the-Lake Black History tour

Day 3 – Toronto Black History walking tour, part 1

Day 4 – Caribbean carnival in Toronto

Day 5 – Meet Harriet Tubman

Day 6 – Oakville and Hamilton Underground Railroad tour

Day 7 – Toronto Black History walking tour, part 2.

Day 8 – Depart Toronto

toronto black history tour

Facts File

  • 8 day land tour.
  • Minimum 30 and maximum 50 participants.
  • All meals and accommodation included.
  • All tours lead by Black History experts.
  • Start and end in Toronto.
  • Comfort level – enjoy bus rides and able to walk for about two hours each day.
  • Accommodation – comfortable hotel.
  • Departure – August 1-8, 2018.

Who wants to come with on this Daydream Black History Tour? Let’s see if we can make it real.

50 Places: A Black History Travel Guide of London

Hate, Freedom and Academic Crowdfunding

In my mind academics don’t do crowdfunding. They think. They lecture. They write. Academics don’t beg. At least not in public.

Crowdfunding is the latest spin on an old idea – use other people’s money to fund your dream research, inventions or business ideas. In the old days artists depended on patrons – a fat lord of the manor, a duchess with a social conscience or a scheming archbishop – to supply their projects. These days they turn to the internet.

The technology has made it easier to match money seekers with money givers. And it has blurred the lines between begging and investing.

The three most popular crowdfunding sites are Kickstarter, Indiegogo and Patreon. Each caters to a different market. Kickstarter is best for entrepreneurs with a business idea. Indiegogo is for people, especially artists, looking to fund a particular project. Patreon is geared towards creative types looking for long term patronage.

Some academics have climbed out of their ivory towers and entered the world of crowdfunding. When research grants are hard to get, crowdfunding can fill the gap.

Ask Jordan Peterson.

This University of Toronto professor has raised a staggering $61,000 per month on Patreon. That is over half a million a year. His goal is to reach a million dollars a year. Peterson is using the money to fund his research against the use of transgender pronouns and political correctness on campus. In other words why social justice, sexuality studies and feminism are an attack on white people, specifically straight white men.

So far Peterson has 5,500 people donating to his research. His biggest backers are those longing for the days of empire and white Christian supremacy. Under the guise of freedom of speech, they want the freedom to attack anyone – especially Black and other people of colour – who don’t agree with their view.

Jordan Peterson is white privilege in action.

I have launched my own Patreon site. On the other side of my life I write adventure stories about travelling while Black. It’s probably the kind of thing that would make Jordan Peterson twitch. It takes time and money to do the research and to travel for the adventures. My PhD scholarship does not stretch that far. How many patrons will fund me? Will you be the first?

Patrons will get recognition. The dedication page of my new book will record the names of all the generous souls who donated for a year of more. They are investing in the success of a student and a Black travel writer.

50 Places: A Black History Travel Guide of London